Fast Company

Why L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti Relies On Jazz And Ruzzle To Get Through His Day | Fast Company | business + innovation

Why L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti Relies On Jazz And Ruzzle To Get Through His Day Here’s how the ultra-busy mayor gets everything done. “You can’t let the urgent overcome the important,” he says.

By Jillian Goodman

Since taking office in 2013, Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti has tackled tough issues such as water conservation, raising the minimum wage, and homelessness. His next order of business? “Being a builder,” says the onetime international affairs professor and human rights advocate. “Building a great city, building an economy, building an infrastructure, and, ultimately, building people’s trust in government.” He’s also a delegator, a traveler, and a master napper.

Strategy to beat procrastination

“Schedule every second of every minute of every hour of every day.”

Biggest productivity issue

“Being reactive. That’s part of my job description: There is always going to be a fire, a shooting, a crisis, but you can’t let the urgent overcome the important.”

Sleep schedule

“The greatest gift I have is my ability to sleep. I can sleep basically at the drop of a hat: for two minutes, for 20 minutes, for two hours. I can sleep in cars. I’ve slept on subways. I’ve slept on jumping speedboats and even trotting horses. I don’t have any problem turning off my mind and falling asleep. And I need my sleep. If I get much less than seven hours a night, it’ll be tough.”

Time-management system

“I have an executive officer who can be like a second brain. The higher up you go in leadership, the less control you have to have. Just cede control of your schedule to the smarter people [on your staff] and they will make you work from the moment you wake up to the moment you go to sleep.”

Coping tactic

“When I’m overwhelmed I like playing Ruzzle. It’s like a Boggle game on your smartphone. I’m pretty good at unplugging when things get stressful and just kind of breathing.”

Go-to motivator

“My household and my daughter. My wife and I have been foster parents, too, and that motivated me in a very personal way. The other one is my city: the highs and the lows of human existence, which mayors have a unique window into.”

Decompression method

“I play music. I’m a pianist, and I write music. Jazz is my main area, but I’ve written musicals and singer-songwriter stuff. I can clearly carry a tune, but you want somebody else to sing it when you record it. Also travel. I’ve been to 75 countries and all seven continents, and that definitely is a spiritual recharge.”

Source: Why L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti Relies On Jazz And Ruzzle To Get Through His Day | Fast Company | business + innovation

[Photo: Tommaso Mei]

Fast Company

Why This Microsoft Exec Uses Laziness As A Productivity Strategy | Fast Company | business + innovation

Procrastination as a productivity tool? As Microsoft’s chief experience officer, Julie Larson-Green’s job is to help people work smarter. But when it comes to her own day, she has a somewhat counterintuitive approach. A 22-year Microsoft veteran, Larson-Green is responsible for the overarching experience of getting stuff done with Office and other tools on PCs, phones, wearables, and tablets. “We want to help you manage your scarce resource of time,” she says. Here’s how she does that herself

Strategy to beat procrastination

“I’m a huge procrastinator and a fairly lazy person. Being lazy makes me more efficient, because I try to find ways that I can do the best work in the most minimal amount of time. I also know that I need pressure to perform, and procrastination is one of the levers for creating that pressure.”

Time-management system

“I keep a lot in my head: people I need to talk to, projects I’m working on. I usually have a running tally of things I need to get done. But I also keep a lot in Outlook. Unread mail is my to-do list.”

Media matters

“I spend some time before I get out of bed looking at Twitter and Facebook, looking at headlines about Microsoft. That doesn’t always sound like the most productive thing—it sounds like leisure reading. But it often comes out in things later: ‘Oh, I read this article about that—here’s something to think about.’ ”

A quiet start

“I need thinking time, so I carve out a few hours, usually in the morning. I get centered and ready to go.”

Great advice

“My parents always focused on making sure you finish what you start, and you do what you say you’re going to do. That was instilled pretty early in my family. My sisters and I are all kind of overachievers, so I think it worked.”

Source: Why This Microsoft Exec Uses Laziness As A Productivity Strategy | Fast Company | business + innovation

[Photo: Clayton Cotterell]

Fast Company

Designer Joy Cho On The Power Of Writing Things Down | Fast Company | business + innovation

Designer Joy Cho On The Power Of Writing Things Down That’s just one of her keys to getting everything done. “Things are always racing in my head,” she says. By Jeff Chu Joy Cho, the Los Angeles–based designer, author, and founder of the lifestyle site Oh Joy!, has big goals: “To make life happier and prettier and more meaningful,” she says. One of Pinterest’s most influential users (she has more than 13 million followers), Cho is known for creating cheery, brightly hued%

Source: Designer Joy Cho On The Power Of Writing Things Down | Fast Company | business + innovation

Fast Company

Oprah Winfrey’s Proven Method For Coping With Stress | Fast Company | business + innovation

Oprah Winfrey’s Proven Method For Coping With Stress What does Oprah do when things get too intense? How does she beat procrastination? Here’s how Winfrey gets everything done. By J.J. McCorvey We recently spent a couple of days learning about Oprah Winfrey’s empire, her huge number of projects, and how she handles everything. Here are a few other things we learned about her work life.

Source: Oprah Winfrey’s Proven Method For Coping With Stress | Fast Company | business + innovation

Fast Company

How Google’s Head Of Marketing Handles Twenty Meetings A Day | Fast Company | business + innovation

How Google’s Head Of Marketing Handles Twenty Meetings A Day A look at the ways Google’s SVP of global marketing, Lorraine Twohill, tackles her day. “Time to think is the scarcest resource,” she says. By Elizabeth Segran “Google is a very fast-paced place,” says Lorraine Twohill, the company’s senior VP of global marketing. “It’s never gotten boring, but you also have to be super organized.” A 12-year Google veteran, Twohill is intimately familiar with the company’s produ

Source: How Google’s Head Of Marketing Handles Twenty Meetings A Day | Fast Company | business + innovation

Fast Company

Airbnb’s Belinda Johnson On Why Being Too Productive Can Be A Problem | Fast Company | business + innovation

Airbnb’s Belinda Johnson On Why Being Too Productive Can Be A Problem Plus other insight into how she gets everything done. “I have to force myself to take breaks,” she says. By Jillian Goodman For the past four years, Airbnb’s chief business affairs and legal officer, Belinda Johnson, has been responsible for Airbnb’s regulatory efforts, a tough, sometimes controversial position as the company has grown. Now she’s been promoted to an even bigger role, helping to ste

Source: Airbnb’s Belinda Johnson On Why Being Too Productive Can Be A Problem | Fast Company | business + innovation